More and more companies today are latching onto the potential of gamification to drive engagement and awareness, and the number of companies delivering gamification-specific services has also increased. Although many marketers are familiar with the principles of gamification, some still struggle to incorporate these into their overall marketing strategies. Debbie Hemley, from Social Media Examiner, published a useful guide to the 26 elements of a good gamification marketing strategy, or 26 things marketers need to keep in mind when building a strategy.

Here are the elements we found to be most useful:

" Player Types" - understand the different ways that people interact with games

Richard Hartle's theory on the 4 player types is often cited - the types include Achievers, Explorers, Killers and Socialites. Achievers, for example, have the ultimate goal of gathering points and rising in levels, while explorers prefer the journey, or finding new avenues or points-gathering along the way.

Badges are Great Rewards

Particularly since the rise of Foursquare and other social check-in sites, badges have become a very common and useful tactic for engaging with your customers and rewarding them for their participation. How will your company make use of them? Don't Forget Demographics!

As with any other marketing initiative or activity, it's always important to understand who your target market is. For example, as stats from the 2011 Los Angeles Game Conference indicate, "50% of gamers are reported as being female...and there are over 200 million gamers on Facebook".

Flow Theory

Hungarian psychology professor Mihály Csíkszentmihályi came up with what is known as "flow theory" which for gamification, is the ultimate goal. Flow refers to a deep concentration on the task at hand, over emotions or physical needs. With flow, there can be a distorted perception of time, and a very high degree of concentration.

Incentivizing Online Activities

Providing incentives for certain activities or behaviours on the site is a critical part of gamification strategy. Going back to the importance of demographics, if you are able to get into the headspace of your users, you'll know best how to keep them in the game and grow their loyalty.

Work and Play are Not Opposing Concepts


As Dr. Stuart Brown states in this TEDtalk, play can actually encourage productivity at work, when done properly. Play is the what lies at the heart of gamification.

To view the other factors to keep in mind with any gamification strategy, click here.


Originally posted on Marqui's Web Marketing Blog

What to Consider When Putting Together a Gamification Strategy

More and more companies today are latching onto the potential of gamification to drive engagement and awareness, and the number of companies delivering gamification-specific services has also increased.

Although many marketers are familiar with the principles of gamification, some still struggle to incorporate these into their overall marketing strategies. Debbie Hemley, from Social Media Examiner, published a useful guide to the 26 elements of a good gamification marketing strategy, or 26 things marketers need to keep in mind when building a strategy.

Here are the elements we found to be most useful:

" Player Types" - understand the different ways that people interact with games

Richard Hartle's theory on the 4 player types is often cited - the types include Achievers, Explorers, Killers and Socialites. Achievers, for example, have the ultimate goal of gathering points and rising in levels, while explorers prefer the journey, or finding new avenues or points-gathering along the way.

Badges are Great Rewards

Particularly since the rise of Foursquare and other social check-in sites, badges have become a very common and useful tactic for engaging with your customers and rewarding them for their participation. How will your company make use of them?

    Don't Forget Demographics!

    As with any other marketing initiative or activity, it's always important to understand who your target market is. For example, as stats from the 2011 Los Angeles Game Conference indicate, "50% of gamers are reported as being female...and there are over 200 million gamers on Facebook".

    Flow Theory

    Hungarian psychology professor Mihály Csíkszentmihályi came up with what is known as "flow theory" which for gamification, is the ultimate goal. Flow refers to a deep concentration on the task at hand, over emotions or physical needs. With flow, there can be a distorted perception of time, and a very high degree of concentration.

    Incentivizing Online Activities

    Providing incentives for certain activities or behaviours on the site is a critical part of gamification strategy. Going back to the importance of demographics, if you are able to get into the headspace of your users, you'll know best how to keep them in the game and grow their loyalty.

    Work and Play are Not Opposing Concepts


    As Dr. Stuart Brown states in this TEDtalk, play can actually encourage productivity at work, when done properly. Play is the what lies at the heart of gamification.

    To view the other factors to keep in mind with any gamification strategy, click here.


    Originally posted on Marqui's Web Marketing Blog

    Blogger Profile: Marqui Web Marketing Blog
    Marqui's Web Marketing Blog is brought to you by their marketing and consulting team to share ideas, best practices and trends from the world of web marketing. The blog aims to cover a broad array of topics relating to web marketing including content management, conversion optimization, SEO, email marketing and lead nurturing.

    Posted by Sue Ansell at April 17, 2012 5:00 AM

    Categories: Sales and marketing

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