HP released a whitepaper recently on Predicting the Future With Social Media. In this case looking at the relationship between twitter chatter and the popularity of movies. It made me thing about the use of these kinds of analytic techniques for Good and for Evil.

The best example I could think of for a good usage was the Comcast cares activity -- mining through the Twitter and other feeds, looking for people having trouble with Comcast and then proactively helping them out. Essentially short cutting the old problem that when you have a good experience you'll tell 4 people but if you have a bad experience telling 10.

An example of using social media analytics for a bad purpose is PleaseRobMe.com. This site is an effort to educate people on how the information placed in social media sites is public and can be used for nefarious purposes.

There are many ways to understand Buzz. With the advent of relatively infinite storage and computational capability, the techniques above are the tip of the iceberg for increasing visibility of what is going on around us. These same kinds of techniques can be applied to a variety of unstructured data (dark data) that is streaming around organizations today.

Originally posted on The Next Big Thing blog


Mining data streams to predict the future

HP released a whitepaper recently on Predicting the Future With Social Media. In this case looking at the relationship between twitter chatter and the popularity of movies. It made me thing about the use of these kinds of analytic techniques for Good and for Evil.

The best example I could think of for a good usage was the Comcast cares activity -- mining through the Twitter and other feeds, looking for people having trouble with Comcast and then proactively helping them out. Essentially short cutting the old problem that when you have a good experience you'll tell 4 people but if you have a bad experience telling 10.

An example of using social media analytics for a bad purpose is PleaseRobMe.com. This site is an effort to educate people on how the information placed in social media sites is public and can be used for nefarious purposes.

There are many ways to understand Buzz. With the advent of relatively infinite storage and computational capability, the techniques above are the tip of the iceberg for increasing visibility of what is going on around us. These same kinds of techniques can be applied to a variety of unstructured data (dark data) that is streaming around organizations today.

Originally posted on The Next Big Thing blog

Blogger Profile: Charlie Bess
Charles Bess has worked in the Information Technology industry for about 30 years supporting a variety of large organizations and industries. Charlie has performed a variety of formal and technical leadership roles throughout EDS and now HP. He is a licensed professional engineer and in 2002, a senior member of IEEE and was recognized as a Fellow within HP for his focus on value delivery and innovation. Currently he is focused on the Chief Technologist functional relationship between HP and its largest clients. In addition to these activities, Charlie has also worked as a public speaker, advisor to SMUs MBA program and supported engineering and computer science activities at Purdue University and University of North Texas. He’s been blogging on technology and business value related topics since early 2003.

Posted by Sue Ansell at April 29, 2010 12:00 PM

Categories: Social media

Comments

Name
URL (remove the http://)
Email
Comments (field is limited to 2000 characters)
   

TrackBack Link

    Printer-friendly     

Backbone Mag on Facebook Backbone Mag on Twitter Backbone Mag on Linkedin


Discovery 2014


Backbone magazine latest digital issue

Backbone magazine September 2013

Backbone magazine June 2013

Backbone magazine March 2013

Backbone magazine November 2012 issue

Backbone magazine September 2012 issue