In a few weeks, we’re getting ready to launch a new service called CleanMyCRM. We started the service at the request of customers who needed a smarter way to research incomplete contact records. They told us append services are expensive and they were looking for ways to clean smaller batches (1000 records).

The cost of dirty data is huge. Factor in the cost of bounced emails, returned direct mail, wasted time, salaries paid to sales people who are calling people that don’t exist in that role anymore.

Our service is simple – human researchers that manually maintain your database so that your sales and marketing teams have a edge in their next campaign. Human researchers to manually review, research and update incomplete contact records. Thanks to the power of technology to streamline our workflow, we can research 1000 records for only $400.

We’ve always preached that clean CRM is a journey – not a destination. It is an ongoing process. Cliff Langston likens cleaning the CRM to painting the Golden Gate bridge. “What do you do when you are done? Start over at the beginning.”

Getting started cleaning your CRM is not really that difficult. You can reduce your stale data and your data cleaning costs by following a few simple steps:

1) Someone should own the project. Your CRM administrator, your marketing manager, your sales admin. It doesn’t matter who owns it as long as someone owns it and is measured and evaluated based on the completeness and accuracy of the database.

2) Prevent bad data at the source. When you standardize data entry formats and enforce completion of critical fields, you eliminate a large part of the problem before it even begins.

3) Link customer self-service features to your CRM data. When customers maintain their contact information for you, you capture better data and maintain better data with little cost.

4) Use third parties to validate your data a couple of times a year.  A regular schedule of data validation and augmentation prevents data from getting stale.

Of course, if you need your CRM cleaned, give me a call or visit the website at www.cleanmycrm.com. If you think I should add additional tips to this article, send them over and I’ll add them. 

Originally posted on Marketing, Sales and Anything Else


How often should you clean your CRM?

In a few weeks, we’re getting ready to launch a new service called CleanMyCRM. We started the service at the request of customers who needed a smarter way to research incomplete contact records. They told us append services are expensive and they were looking for ways to clean smaller batches (1000 records).

The cost of dirty data is huge. Factor in the cost of bounced emails, returned direct mail, wasted time, salaries paid to sales people who are calling people that don’t exist in that role anymore.

Our service is simple – human researchers that manually maintain your database so that your sales and marketing teams have a edge in their next campaign. Human researchers to manually review, research and update incomplete contact records. Thanks to the power of technology to streamline our workflow, we can research 1000 records for only $400.

We’ve always preached that clean CRM is a journey – not a destination. It is an ongoing process. Cliff Langston likens cleaning the CRM to painting the Golden Gate bridge. “What do you do when you are done? Start over at the beginning.”

Getting started cleaning your CRM is not really that difficult. You can reduce your stale data and your data cleaning costs by following a few simple steps:

1) Someone should own the project. Your CRM administrator, your marketing manager, your sales admin. It doesn’t matter who owns it as long as someone owns it and is measured and evaluated based on the completeness and accuracy of the database.

2) Prevent bad data at the source. When you standardize data entry formats and enforce completion of critical fields, you eliminate a large part of the problem before it even begins.

3) Link customer self-service features to your CRM data. When customers maintain their contact information for you, you capture better data and maintain better data with little cost.

4) Use third parties to validate your data a couple of times a year.  A regular schedule of data validation and augmentation prevents data from getting stale.

Of course, if you need your CRM cleaned, give me a call or visit the website at www.cleanmycrm.com. If you think I should add additional tips to this article, send them over and I’ll add them. 

Originally posted on Marketing, Sales and Anything Else

Blogger Profile: Ben Bradley
I help companies solve big hairy problems at the intersection of marketing, sales and technology. I write, sell (for some of the world’s greatest companies), market, consult and organize.

Reach me here...

ben@maconraine.com or here ben@benbradley.net  
630-221-9844
Macon Raine, Inc.

Posted by Sue Ansell at July 27, 2012 5:00 AM

Categories: Sales and marketing

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