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CRTC, Competition Bureau Enforcement Actions Show Anti-Spam Law Has Teeth

By Michael Geist  |  Categories: Technology law
As the launch of the Canadian anti-spam law neared last spring, critics warned that enforcement was likely to present an enormous challenge. Citing the global nature of the Internet and the millions of spam messages sent each day, many argued that enforcement bodies such as the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and the Competition Bureau were ill-suited to combating the problem.

We Can’t Hear You: The Shameful Review of Bill C-51 By the Numbers

By Michael Geist  |  Categories: Technology law
The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security will hold its clause-by-clause review of Bill C-51, the Anti-Terrorism bill, this morning. The government is expected to introduce several modest amendments thatexperts note do little to address some of the core concerns with the bill. 

What Open Government Hides

By Michael Geist  |  Categories: Technology law Trends
Treasury Board President Tony Clement unveiled the latest version of his Open Government Action Plan last month, continuing a process that has seen some important initiatives to make government data such as statistical information and mapping data publicly available in open formats free from restrictive licenses.

Carol Todd on Bill C-13: 'What Happened to Democracy?'

By Michael Geist  |  Categories: Social media Technology law
The Senate Committee on Justice and Human Rights continues its study later today [November 26, 2014] on Bill C-13, the cyber-bullying/lawful access bill that has already passed the House of Commons and seems certain to clear the Senate shortly.

Ontario Provincial Police Recommend Ending Anonymity on the Internet

By Michael Geist  |  Categories: Security Technology law
The Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs began its hearings on Bill C-13, the lawful access/cyberbullying bill last week with an appearance from several law enforcement representatives. 

The CRTC – Netflix Battle: Could It Lead to a Challenge of the CRTC’s Right to Regulate Online Video?

By Michael Geist  |  Categories: Technology law Trends
Netflix just concluded an appearance before the CRTC that resulted in a remarkably heated exchange between the regulator and the Internet video service. The discussion was very hostile with the CRTC repeatedly ordering Netflix to provide subscriber and other confidential information.

What the Recording Industry Isn’t Saying About Canada’s Internet Streaming Royalties

By Michael Geist  |  Categories: Technology law
Over the past month, Music Canada, the lead lobby group for the Canadian recording industry, has launched asocial media campaign criticizing a recent Copyright Board of Canada decision that set some of the fees for Internet music streaming companies such as Pandora. 

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